January 2, 2006

Driver’s Licence Lost Because She Had Bulimia

Driver’s licence lost because she had bulimia
CALUM MACDONALD and RAYMOND DUNCAN
December 28 2005
http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/53289.html

A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.

What do you think of this?
I think it s one of the worse things to do, yeah I can understand the whole danger to others because of slower reactions but this woman became a prisoner in her home - this would make me worse. But then again, I don't drive so can not really relate to the 'prisoner in own home' because of lack of driving.

Hugs
Sarah Lou
PRC
xoxo

2 comments:

  1. THIS IS BS! If someone who's bulimic is prevented from driving because of how their health COULD effect their driving, that opens the door to virtually hundreds of other diseases we should "police", but don't. Why bulimia? Alcoholics who literally go to AA, or have been appointed to go are not necessarily prevented from driving. And we all know how much more of a risk they pose.

    All I can say to this is WOW.
    xoS

    ReplyDelete
  2. OMG,
    I can't believe this one. If the woman had a physical, blood test etc and then had a discussion because of her health is one thing, but to mention to her shrink and he pulls that decision out of a bag!! I hope he got tons of PR from this and it was all negative, who the heck would ever trust this guy!!

    I agree, WOW..... scary and freaky

    ReplyDelete

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