January 31, 2006

Heidi Klum under fire in Germany for models reality show

BERLIN (AFP) - German media took supermodel Heidi Klum to task for a new fashion reality show that they charged promotes eating disorders among young women.

"Skinny Madness", screamed the daily Bild, the country's top selling newspaper. "Do you want THAT, Heidi Klum?" it asked, next to pictures of an anorexic 19-year-old named Lisa Pitney and Klum herself in a string bikini.

Pitney, who was not a contestant on the show, told Bild that she had always "admired" Klum. But she warned that "Germany's Next Top Model", in which a group of attractive young women are weeded out by a jury until one wins a modeling contract, was dangerous.

"This show is simply awful," she said. "This is what destroys young girls and drives them to an obsession with being thin." Pitney, who was described as 1.67 meters (5 feet 7 inches) tall and weighing just 44 kilograms (97 pounds), said she was now seeking help to stop extreme dieting.
The Berlin broadsheet Der Tagesspiegel said that Klum's show had launched a debate about whether anorexia had become a "status symbol".

It said that one of the candidates on the program -- 1.76 meters tall and weighing 52 kilograms -- had been voted out by the jury during the pilot episode last week because she was "too fat".
"That is clearly in the range of anorexia," the newspaper quoted the director of an eating disorders clinic in the southern town of Prien, Manfred Fichter, as saying.
It noted that some women on the show, which drew 3.48 million viewers in its first week, had spoken openly about destructive diets.

The network broadcasting the program, ProSieben, dismissed the criticism, saying the jury members were simply enforcing norms that were long established in the fashion industry.

"This debate has been around along as models have -- just think of Twiggy," a channel spokeswoman told Der Tagesspiegel, referring to the rail-thin British model who became a 1960s icon.

"Heidi Klum says several times during the show that models must eat sensibly."

International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals Responds to New Pink Video

(PRWEB) - (PRWEB) January 30, 2006 -- The International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp,) an organization committed to training and certifying professionals in the field of eating disorder treatment, responds immediately:

The latest Pink video "Stupid Girls" highlights the culture’s relentless and unrealistic pursuit of thinness and unattainable drive for physical beauty. iaedp sees this as an opportunity to again remind people of the seriousness of eating disorders which have devastating effects as individuals struggle to achieve social acceptance and self-worth.

The goal of ieadp is to educate the public to focus on the victims who need compassion and encouragement in their attempts to heal. This is an illness not a choice.

President of iaedp, Emmett Bishop, MD, adds, "This video highlights how life-consuming an eating disorder can be. I am hoping that women can see the un-glamorous side of celebrity popularity founded on physical beauty alone."

iaedp does not intend to endorse Pink’s video or personal political position. However, the release of her album and video does occur before the National Eating Disorder Awareness Week and illuminates powerfully the impact of these disorders in this country and elsewhere.
At the same time we applaud the message of Pink’s song and her statement which points out "that if we waste our time, money and energy on trying to be someone else's idea of fabulous, we waste our potential to be something better."

For additional practitioner comments or expert interviews, please feel free to contact a member of the iaedp Board of Directors.
www.iaedp.org

January 26, 2006

Girls on the Run

Building Self-Esteem One Lap at a Time
By Janice Billingsley
HealthDay Reporter
January 23, 2006 9:59 AM


(HealthDay News) -- Hitting puberty can be like hitting a brick wall for a girl.
One day she's playing soccer and softball and hanging out with her girlfriends. The next day she can feel pressure to be pretty, thin, flirtatious and not too smart if she wants to be popular with boys.

How's a girl to navigate her way around this trap?

Molly Barker of Charlotte, N.C., thinks she's hit on a solid solution. She's the founder of Girls on the Run, an innovative program that prepares young girls for the pitfalls of puberty by combining a big dose of running with games, exercises and discussions designed to enhance a girl's self-esteem so she can enter her teens with confidence.
"I really believe that women struggle to remain true to themselves," said Barker, a former Ironman triathlete with a master's degree in social work.

When she was a teen, Barker wrestled with the pressure to fit into what she calls "the girl box," to be popular. Girls on the Run is her effort to reach young girls before they encounter such teen-years turmoil.

The effort seems to be paying off. Begun as an after-school program in 1996 with 13 third-graders from Charlotte, Girls on the Run now operates in 198 cities in the United States and Canada, and has reached approximately 40,000 eight- and nine-year-olds, Barker said. Half of the girls who participate in one 12-week, 24-lesson session sign up for more. And a new program called Girls on Track is being unveiled for older girls who are entering middle school.
"The activities make you feel really good about yourself. I've learned that you don't have to look like a supermodel to be loveable," said Madeleine Moore, a 10-year-old graduate of the Charlotte program.

"I have more confidence," agreed Tuesday Welch, an 11-year-old Charlotte graduate who has signed up for Girls on Track. "I've learned to look at myself on the inside, and not listen to what other people say about me."

A Girls on the Run program, which meets twice weekly after school, offers running at a track as the centerpiece for each session. But exercise is only part of the goal. The broader aim is to enhance the girls' social, emotional, physical and spiritual health, Barker said.
"The program is founded on three key concepts," Barker said.

The first four weeks help the girls to think about themselves in an objective way -- "This is what I believe and this is what I stand for," she said. To make it fun, Barker has created games, including one in which the names of different emotions -- anger, anxiety, joy and sadness, for example -- are written on separate index cards. The girls race each other while compiling a bingo-like collection of the cards, then talk about their own emotions and how to best manage them.

The second four weeks of the program, again including relay races and other physical activity, focuses on teamwork, dealing with conflict (such as learning how not to gossip) and building a sense of connectedness with each other.

Finally, the girls learn to understand they're part of a larger community and can use their skills and power to change the community for the better.

Nadine Koslow, professor and chief psychologist at Emory University School of Medicine, said, "This is a wonderful age to start this. The healthier foundation you have, the more you have to build on so that when things get stressful, you have the resources to cope with them."
And, she added, the non-competitive nature of the program teaches the girls teamwork and builds their self-confidence.

Melissa Welch, Tuesday's mother, is delighted with the lessons her daughter has learned from Girls on the Run, and wishes it could continue as her child gets older.
"It's going to end before she outgrows it," she said.

To learn more, visit Girls on the Run.

January 25, 2006

Anorexia in Men

Anorexia in men is a growing problem that few recognize and even fewer are willing to talk about
By Shaya Tayefe Mohajer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK - Much has been written about the rapid weight loss of such Hollywood starlets as Lindsay Lohan and Nicole Ritchie.

But a silent population has been whittling away, dangerously, far from snarky gossip pages and under the radar of many doctors.

Men who struggle with anorexia nervosa, which is routinely underdiagnosed, often find themselves marginalized not only by their negative self-image, but by the way the disease has been stereotyped as a female disorder.

Experts say that the number of men with eating disorders is on the rise, with cultural influences like chiseled rappers, metrosexual male models and even animated heroes sharing some blame. The National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders estimates that a million men suffer from eating disorders - one in every eight Americans with such a disorder.
"With males, we're still at a stage that we're not on the alert," said Dr. Steven Levenkron, an eating-disorder specialist and author who has treated anorexics for 34 years.
One reason for the underdiagnosis: male anorexics often overexercise more than they undereat. Thus, rather than refusing meals, they might even eat what appears to be a normal diet - but because they spend hours every day exercising, the net effect is that they will lose weight, radically and dangerously.

As a high-school athlete, Gary Grahl practically lived in the gym and served himself dinners of vegetables with a "dressing" of tomato soup.
"I would exercise constantly. I'd get up at 3:30 in the morning and exercise before school. I'd work out after school, and again before bed," said Grahl, now 37.
Even when the 5'9" Grahl, who played baseball, basketball and football, hit 103 pounds, he obsessed about the fat content of foods. Though he was hungry all the time and loved food, Grahl always said he was full.
"A person with an eating disorder will always say they're full, but I was always hungry. I liked feeling hunger because it felt like power," Grahl said.

His goal was to weigh 90 lbs - a goal he could not reach before being hospitalized.
Whittling down to such a dangerously low weight seems contrary to the muscle-bound images of men in the media. But Levenkron said that other personality traits are at work.
"When I treat women, I'm working against a lot of media and ads - I'm outnumbered. But with men, I fight their obsessiveness," Levenkron said.

The typical male anorexic will express rigidity in thinking or overthink what should be simple decisions. Male anorexics can charm a room but lack the ability to have close relationships with others. Marked drops in libido are also common.

At least one British study, conducted by the Eating Disorder Association in London, noted that issues of gender and sexuality are often tied to male anorexia - perhaps a factor in making it a more taboo topic.
"In males who are gay there's a much higher incidence of males with eating disorders," said Steve Bloomfield, a spokesperson for the EDA. "It does particularly affect the gay community because the community has a particular interest in physique and looks, and plus, you've got the stress of coming out or not."

Another reason that anorexia can go undetected in men is as simple as the physical difference in anatomies of men and women, Levenkron explains. Because men don't menstruate, doctors can't rely on the cessation of menstruation as a physiological indicator of an eating disorder, as they do in women.

Men also might be more reluctant to talk about eating disorders - a notoriously secretive problem for both sexes.
"I had to go through therapy to learn to socialize and express my feelings," said Grahl, whose anorexia was diagnosed in 1985 and who was treated until Dec. 15, 1989. "In a way, it was immature, and I had to grow up."

Now a high-school counselor in Sturgeon Bay, Wis., Grahl has been married for 12 years and has three children. He says that his life has completely turned around. He hasss learned how to have closer relationships with his loved ones and about his own needs and now he shares his experiences through public speaking.
"I want people to know, it's OK to talk about it," Grahl said. "It's hard, but it's OK to talk about it."

January 18, 2006

ELLEgirl Questions 10,000 Girls on How They Feel About Their Bodies

ELLEgirl Questions 10,000 Girls on How They Feel About Their Bodies
HealthNewsDigest.com - January 16, 2006

ELLEgirl asked 10,000+ ELLEgirls from the U.S., Holland, Korea, Russia, and the U.K. how they feel about their bodies. We asked the hard questions: Have you ever struggled with an eating disorder? Do you wish you had someone else's butt/thighs/breasts? ELLEgirl readers shared the pressures they face, their most insecure moments, and what they love most about themselves.

ELLEgirl discovered that:

60% of girls in American have a positive body image, opposed to Korea where only 17% have a healthy body image

The number one aim of polled U.S. girls aged 11-17 years is to be thinner, rather than smarter, funnier, or friendlier

While 86% of Russian girls chose being healthy over being thin, only 70% of American girls felt the same way

Only 18% of American girls have used diet pills or drinks to make you slimmer, as opposed to a staggering 68% of Korean girls

Children as young as 5 are concerned with weight and shape. Over 80% of U.S. 10-year olds are afraid of being fat; and over 50% of 9 and 10-year olds feel better about themselves when they are on a diet

January 17, 2006

Schoolgirls Face Bulimia Crisis

Schoolgirls face bulimia crisis
18 January 2006
By KIM THOMAS

Bulimic schoolgirls are vomiting in groups, a new trend prompting concerns the behaviour of popular teenage stars may be to blame.

Concern over growing numbers of students with eating disorders has prompted at least one school, Nelson College for Girls, to introduce a tough new regime with parents asked to vouch for their children's food consumption before they are allowed to attend school.

Bulimia has regained prominence as the disease of the famous, with many young stars, such as Lindsay Lohan, admitting to suffering from it, and American Idol judge Paula Abdul becoming a spokeswoman for the anti-bulimia cause.

This week, Dolly magazine reported that starlets Nichole Richie and Lohan were in a "skinny pact" and planned their diets together. Richie reportedly weighs less than 45kg.

The clinical head of the South Island Eating Disorders Service, Dr Geoffrey Buckett, said he was horrified to find, when interviewing a group of Christchurch students recently, that joint vomiting sessions were accepted or in some cases considered normal by teenage bulimics. He said three Christchurch students told him: "We go around behind the sheds in groups of 10 of us and drink milk and throw up." Skipping lunch and dinner before going out on a date or with friends "so your belly doesn't show" was another example of dysfunctional eating habits considered normal by many schoolgirls.

Buckett said the emergence of group vomiting sessions was an indication of how entrenched eating disorders had become, particularly in schools.

The growing gap between increasingly obese New Zealanders and ideals promoted by the current crop of super-thin Hollywood celebrities may be contributing to the problem. "If you look at talk shows like Oprah Winfrey, eating disorders and always being on a diet are staple subjects being discussed," Buckett said.

Nelson College for Girls had the worst incidence of students with eating disorders in the South Island and last year developed a rigid programme to deal with the problem, he said. Girls were allowed at school only if their parents signed a form saying their child had eaten breakfast, and students had to leave school if they did not eat lunch, he said. Nelson College for Girls principal Alison McAlpine was not available for comment yesterday, but a school spokeswoman said the school had run a successful programme aimed at combating eating disorders among students.

Bulimics binge-eat and then, to prevent weight gain, compensate by vomiting, misuse of laxatives and diuretics, fasting or excessive exercise. One in 20 18 to 24-year-olds has had bulimia at some time.

Buckett said psychologists needed to create an individual plan for schools with particular problems, depending on the number of students involved and their specific eating disorders. About 2400 new cases of anorexia or bulimia were diagnosed every year, and more than twice this number would fall under the category of "non-specific eating disorders", he said.

The Press yesterday spoke to eight teenage girls, all of whom had either suffered from an eating disorder or knew someone who had. None of the girls had been involved in group vomiting sessions. "That's just sick," said one teenager. "There was this fat chick at my school and she was always going around telling people she was throwing up, and I reckon it was to get sympathy," said a 17-year-old, who had bulimia when she was at intermediate school. A 15-year-old said she had bulimia last year, and confided in her mother because she was ashamed.

Canterbury-Westland Secondary School Principals' Association chairwoman Linda Tame said school staff were always vigilant for eating disorders among students. "If that is happening (vomiting in groups), then it is a very upsetting thing," she said. Bulimia commonly begins in the teens, although cases have been recorded in children as young as six.

SIGNS TO LOOK FOR
An obsession or new focus on dieting or specific food regimes.
Secretive eating behaviour.
Going to the toilet straight after meals.
Becoming withdrawn or depressed.
Information is available at www.eatingdisorders.org.nz/

Have an ED, Go to London!

Eating disorder sufferers seek London helpUlster sufferers seek help
By Nigel Gould


17 January 2006 An increasing number of Ulster people are travelling to London for specialist help with severe eating disorder conditions, it can be revealed today.

Dozens have gone to the St George's Hospital-based eating disorder specialist unit for ssessment and treatment - at a cost of millions to the NHS - as there is no such help here. Since 2000, some 87 of the province's most seriously ill patients have sought help there. Last year saw the highest number of the millennium with 22 people from across Ulster attending the hospital - 18 of whom received treatment.

Ann McCann, founder member of the Belfast-based Eating Disorders Support Group, said they were receiving calls every day. "People, particularly young women, are desperate for help," she said. "Those who go to St George's are very ill - it is difficult otherwise to get seen there. This is only for the really ill patients. There is no real alternative. "Eating disorders have been neglected over the years, yet they have the highest mortality rates of all psychiatric illnesses."

The shock figures were obtained from Shaun Woodward in reply to a parliamentary question from DUP MP, Iris Robinson. In addition, it was revealed that during 2004, health boards spent over £1m on sending 11 patients to St George's for treatment.

Mrs Robinson said: "The number of local patients requiring both treatment and assessment for treatment outside the province for eating disorders has steadily increased in recent years. "A short time ago, I visited St George's Hospital to see the work there at first hand and discuss the feasibility of creating an inpatient unit in Northern Ireland. It became apparent at that stage that enough local health care staff didn't have the very specialised training necessary to operate a full-time inpatient unit, and that it was better to concentrate on outpatient and day hospital facilities and seek to develop the skills base over a number of years."

Existing Ulster services for those with eating disorders suffered a setback nearly two years ago when Northern Ireland's only consultant, specialising in the conditions, retired. But cash has been provided for a new service which, it is hoped, will be up and running within the next few months.

Last year, the Department of Health promised £1m to Ulster's four health boards to fund the recruitment of an additional 18 specialist practitioners in eating disorders. Plans are also under way for the appointment of an additional consultant psychiatrist specialising in eating disorders. "This is good news," Ann added. "There is hope for 1,700 people with anorexia in Northern Ireland and some 17,000 with bulimia." My family thought I was going to die.

As her weight slipped to just 5st 12lbs, Jacqui King's worried family thought she was going to die. Battling both anorexia and bulimia during the lowest point of her life, the Co Down woman desperately needed help. "I would not want to go back to this time," she said. "The family thought I was going to die. I never did though. "You have to realise that with eating disorders you are trapped in this world. "But you do eventually have to ask yourself are you happy with this life? You have to get it into your head that being thin does not make you happy."

Now aged 42, Jacqui has been battling eating disorders since she was 16. Back then, there were no specialist services and Jacqui was sent to her local psychiatric unit. "At that stage I was about seven and a half stone. I went to a psychiatric unit but it did not inspire me with confidence.
"I was left to have my own personal battle to sort myself out. I assumed that being thin made me a better person. I got married at 23 and that stage I had bulimia as well. My husband did not know. I hid it so well. "Later I went to a private clinic in Glasgow and stayed there for two months. A year later I was at my lowest weight, 5st 12lbs." "Around 1997 my husband went to Northern Ireland's only specialist at that time. "I went to see her and it did help. Now, I am as recovered as I will ever be but I do not think you ever fully recover."

Anybody who wants further information about eating disorders should phone the Eating Disorders Support Group on 9023 5959.

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/story.jsp?story=676160

January 15, 2006

Felicity Huffman Reveals She Was Bulimic

Tonight on 60 Minutes Felicity Huffman, star of Desperate Housewives and the current film, Transamerica, revealed to Leslie Stahl that she had been Bulimic when she was young.

Unfortunately, when questioned why, she said that like many young girls it was the feeling of not being able to be thin enough. Her answer really disappointed me. I also felt that it was not honest. She breezed over the topic.

Ironically, she was very honest, and forceful when questioned if being a mother was the greatest thing of her life. She said no, and that she resented the question. It startled Leslie Stahl who didn't handle the response well. She bumbled around using typical cultural guideline question...do you not spend enough time, are you not doing the right things...yada YADA.

What Huffman, I believe, was trying to point out was, why would she go there? Why do people always go there? Here's this incredibly successful woman who's on the top of her game professional right now and all Leslie Stahl can do is ask if being a mother is the highlight of her life? I loved Huffman's comeback. I wish she had been more passionate about her experiences with Bulimia.

January 11, 2006

Lohan denies Vanity Fair bulimia story

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Actress Lindsay Lohan has denied telling Vanity Fair that she suffered from bulimia, Teen People magazine said on Wednesday, but Vanity Fair said Lohan's comments are all on tape.

In a Vanity Fair cover story last week the star of films such as "Mean Girls" and "Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen" said she had suffered from eating disorders and admitted dabbling in drugs.

She said she was on the brink of physical and emotional collapse.

"I was making myself sick. I was sick and I had people sit me down and say, 'You're going to die if you don't take care of yourself,"' Lohan, 19, told Vanity Fair.

The admission that she was fighting bulimia, which made her lose weight at an alarming rate, was an apparent U-turn from interviews last year. It was when she saw footage of herself on a "Saturday Night Live" appearance looking skeletal that Lohan became aware of how ill she really was, Vanity Fair reported.

"I saw that 'SNL' after I did it. My arms were disgusting. I had no arms," she said.
But Teen People's online edition on Wednesday said Lohan denied the claims made in the article. "The words that I gave to the writer for Vanity Fair were misused and misconstrued, and I'm appalled with the way it was done," Teen People quoted Lohan as saying in an e-mail dated January 9.

Lohan accused the Vanity Fair reporter of "lies and changing of my words." Lohan publicist Leslie Sloane Zelnik told Teen People the actress has never battled bulimia. Vanity Fair defended its reporter and the story by saying: "Evgenia Peretz is one of our most reliable reporters. Every word Lindsay Lohan told her is on tape. Vanity Fair stands by the story."

A spokeswoman told Reuters that when Peretz specifically asked Lohan whether making herself sick meant throwing up, the answer was yes. Lohan's condition led to a two-week hospitalization with a swollen liver and kidney infection last year, Vanity Fair said. Vanity Fair also quoted Lohan as saying: "I think younger kids should know it's OK to experience things in life and I'm not encouraging going ... off the deep end and having an eating disorder. I'm saying, if you at least admit those kinds of things ... then they don't feel the urge to go and do that."

In the original Vanity Fair article, Peretz wrote that Zelnik had asked to have Lohan's confession of drug use omitted from the article. Lohan had told Vanity Fair that she used drugs "a little" but quickly tried to retract the admission and denied that she had taken cocaine.

January 10, 2006

Chronic Returners May Be 'Bulimic' Spenders

Chronic Returners May Be 'Bulimic' Spenders
Excessive Returns May Cost the Retail Industry Billions

Jan. 7, 2006 — There are an estimated 15 million shopaholics in America and many of them are chronic returners. Some are driven to return the things they just bought because the feel guilty, or some make the purchase for the high and never really intend to keep the items. Some compare it to the eating disorder bulimia — also characterized by binging and purging. Many consider it a harmless habit, but a woman who asked to remain anonymous said she spends 20 hours a week returning items. Shopping once cost her home and 401K fund. Returning is her way of fulfilling the emotional need to spend. "One hundred percent of the time I have regret, remorse, guilt," she said. "It can make me physically ill." It's been estimated that one in 20 Americans struggle with compulsive shopping and 70 percent of Americans visit the mall once a week.

Dr. April Lane Benson, a psychologist who authored "I Shop, Therefore I Am," said serial returning is a well-kept secret because it carries so much embarrassment and shame. It's "something people don't tend to talk about because the person who is the compulsive returner is often very perfectionistic and feels that they should be more in control," said Benson, a psychologist who specializes in treating compulsive shoppers. Benson said dopamine levels rise during the anticipation of the buy and then crash afterward.

The Impact

It has been estimated that retailers lose billions of dollars a year to bad returns.

To avoid the problem, Mauro Farinelli, the co-owner of the Denim Bar in Arlington, Va., has a seven-day return policy. "You understand how much the item costs, and it looks really good on you which brings you happiness, so there should be no reason why you would want to return," he said. "If you have shopping bags lining your hallway … and your car trunk is a revolving door, you may have a problem," Benson said. She added that people with "bulimic spending" may send others to return their items because they are ashamed and embarrassed. Benson said people should ask themselves a few questions before they buy: Where am I? How do I feel? Do I need this? What if I wait? How will I pay? Where will I put it? "Those questions slow you down so that you really begin to think about what you're doing and what are the consequences," she said.

Actress Talks About Bulimia Struggle

Lindsay Lohan, who was hospitalized in Miami this week for an asthma attack, told Vanity Fair in an interview that she has dabbled in drugs and battled bulimia.

The 19-year-old actress-pop singer said that after the success of 2004’s “Mean Girls,” she dabbled in drugs “a little,” but she quickly added: “I’ve gotten that out of my system.” When asked if her drug use included cocaine, Lohan denied it. She did, though, more openly discuss last year’s drastic weight loss. Lohan acknowledged that she was suffering from bulimia: “I was making myself sick.”Lohan said that before she hosted NBC’s “Saturday Night Live,” Tina Fey and “SNL” executive producer Lorne Michaels sat her down.“They said, ‘You need to take care of yourself. We care about you too much,’ and I just started bawling,”

Lohan said. “I knew I had a problem and I couldn’t admit it.”“I saw that ‘SNL’ after I did it,” she added. “My arms were disgusting. I had no arms.”Lohan said she’s doing much better: “You have to learn for yourself, and you have to hit rock bottom sometimes to get yourself back to the top.

”Lohan co-stars in Robert Altman’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” due in theaters in June. She’s also set to begin shooting “Chapter 27,” a film about John Lennon’s killer, Mark David Chapman, in two weeks.Lohan’s mother and manager, Dina, told OK! magazine Wednesday that her daughter was getting better after being hospitalized Monday night for the asthma attack.

The Associated Press

January 4, 2006

How to create a new thread?

How to create your own string?

Sarah St, You asked how to create your own string/thread whatever it is officially called. What I do is click on 'BlogThis!' This can be found at the top of the home page above the Payson Road banner. There are three tabs in a row - search this blog, search all blogs and blog this. I click on the third one.
Lol, I joined the paysonroad blog back in November but only found this a couple of days ago!

Hope this makes sense
Hugs
Sarah Lou
xoxo
PRC

January 3, 2006

Birth problems link to anorexia

This is a big story here in the UK right now. Most newspapers and all news programmes have mentioned this finding.

Birth problems link to anorexia
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4577338.stm

What happens at birth could have long-term effectsThe likelihood of developing an eating disorder in adulthood may be increased by having had a complicated birth, an Italian study suggests.
Maternal anaemia and placental problems were among the conditions which increased a child's risk of developing anorexia nervosa, researchers found.
Other complications were linked to the development of bulimia, the Archives of General Psychiatry paper suggested.
UK experts said a maternal eating disorders could also be a factor.
Some birth complications are more likely in mothers who have anorexia or bulimia themselves
Eating Disorders Association spokesman
Anorexia is characterised by self-starvation and weight loss, while bulimia involves food "binges" followed by purging.
Both are believed to be caused by a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors.
Previous studies have suggested links between a lack of oxygen and nutrients in the womb and other psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia.
Brain development
University of Padua researchers studied 114 women with anorexia, 73 with bulimia, and a group of 554 of the same age (born between 1971 and 1979) who had neither condition.
The women were studied to see who had developed eating disorders, and if their births had been complicated in any way, using data from hospital records.
In the study, anorexia was also associated with heart problems, low body temperature, tremors and low response to stimuli in newborns.
Placental infarction (death of some placental tissue), poor responses, early difficulties with eating, shorter than average length at birth, and low birth weight were linked to an increased risk of bulimia nervosa.
The researchers found that the number of complications affected the age at which children developed anorexia.
When there were more than five complications, women developed the disorder at an average age of 16.3.
If there had been between one and five complications, onset of anorexia occurred at around 17.5 years.
If there were no birth complications, anorexia developed - on average - at 18.8 years of age.
The team, led by Dr Angela Favaro, writing in the Archives of General Psychiatry, said such birth complications could have an effect on the development of the child's brain.
"This type of relationship is considered evidence of a causal link and would indicate that an impairment in neurodevelopment could be implicated in the pathogenesis [disease development] of anorexia nervosa."
Monitoring
The researchers say they do not have information about the psychiatric history of the mothers, and therefore cannot say if they themselves experienced an eating disorder.
They add: "Although it is unlikely that the presence of psychiatric disturbances in mothers could completely explain the association between obstetric complications and the development of eating disorders, maternal psychiatric morbidity [illness] could be a confounding factor.
"However, other types of maternal factors, including the outcomes of previous pregnancies, did not seem to be associated with an increased risk of developing eating disorders."
Professor Janet Treasure, of the Institute of Psychiatry, said the findings fitted in with other research in the field.
She added: "There is evidence that stress at birth - such as that caused by these complications - sets the stress system so that the sensitivity is high."
A spokesman for the UK's Eating Disorders Association said: "This is a reasonably large study. Its findings are very interesting and deserve more study.
"And there's no question that if there are complications around birth, the child needs careful monitoring."
But he added: "Some birth complications are more likely in mothers who have anorexia or bulimia themselves."

January 2, 2006

Driver’s Licence Lost Because She Had Bulimia

Driver’s licence lost because she had bulimia
CALUM MACDONALD and RAYMOND DUNCAN
December 28 2005
http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/53289.html

A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.
A woman with bulimia lost her right to drive for more than six months because of her condition and was forced to battle through the courts to get her licence back.A sheriff ruled that a psychiatrist's decision that Gillian Carruth, 37, was unfit to drive was not reasonable and the revocation of her licence was "an excessive reaction".Miss Carruth was stripped of her licence in June after a consultant psychiatrist said her bulimia made her a danger to other road users. She had been driving for 20 years without incident.The psychiatrist, Dr Toni Lock, claimed that potassium levels in her body were dangerously low, despite never physically examining her.When she launched a legal action to have her licence reinstated, the DVLA flew another doctor who had never met her from Swansea to give evidence against her.At the conclusion of the case at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court, which cost the taxpayer thousands of pounds, the sheriff overturned the DVLA's decision. Sheriff Robert Vaughan said: "I cannot accept that the decision to revoke her licence is a correct one, or indeed a reasonable one."Miss Carruth, from Beith, North Ayrshire, said losing her licence left her a "prisoner" in her own home. "They took away my life when they took my licence."Miss Carruth attended a routine meeting with Dr Lock in May during which the psychiatrist advised her not to drive because of her poor health.The doctor specifically cited Miss Carruth's low potassium levels as one of the main reasons. Low potassium levels affect physical health, particularly the strength and tone of the muscles, but Dr Lock had not physically examined Miss Carruth.When told not to drive, Miss Carruth replied: "No chance." Her reaction prompted Dr Lock to write to the DVLA recommending the revocation of her licence.Two weeks later, when she had just made the first monthly payment towards the cost of a new car, she received a letter from the DVLA stating she was no longer legally allowed to drive. She visited her GP, Dr Sheila McCarroll, whose opinion was that there was no reason why Miss Carruth could not drive. Dr McCarroll sent her for a test with the Scottish Driving Assessment Service, which she passed. Dr Alex Yellowlees, a consultant psychiatrist and medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, is an expert on eating disorders. He said: "I cannot comment on a particular case, but in general eating disorders can render a person unfit to drive. It is not uncommon for people to be unsafe driving with a severe eating disorder."Severe bulimia involves regular and excessive vomiting which can cause the blood potassium level to fall, which makes people highly susceptible to having epileptic seizures or irregular heartbeats which can result in them losing consciousness suddenly."A spokeswoman for NHS Ayrshire and Arran, which employs Dr Lock, said: "Be-cause of patient confidentiality, we do not comment on individual cases."No-one was available at the DVLA to comment.

What do you think of this?
I think it s one of the worse things to do, yeah I can understand the whole danger to others because of slower reactions but this woman became a prisoner in her home - this would make me worse. But then again, I don't drive so can not really relate to the 'prisoner in own home' because of lack of driving.

Hugs
Sarah Lou
PRC
xoxo

Topiramate Helpful for Bulimia

Topiramate helpful for bulimia

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051228/hl_nm/topiramate_bulimia_dc_1

By Anne Harding Wed Dec 28, 3:22 PM ET
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The drug topiramate, usually used as an anti-seizure treatment, can reduce bingeing and purging in women with bulimia nervosa and improve their quality of life, a new study shows.

The results are comparable to those seen with other medications used for bulimia patients, Dr. Marius K. Nickel, the study's lead author, told Reuters Health. Topiramate would be most suitable as a short-term treatment, he added.
"The most important agent is the psychotherapy," he commented.
Nickel of the Inntalklinik in Simbach am Inn, Germany, and his colleagues assigned 60 women with bulimia to 10 weeks of either daily topiramate treatment or inactive "placebo" treatment. The women, who were at least 18 years old and had bulimia for at least 1 year, kept weekly diaries of their bingeing and purging episodes.
Eleven patients in the topiramate group showed a greater than 50 percent reduction in their frequency of bingeing and purging, compared with one patient in the placebo group, according to the team's report in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.
On average, patients on the drug lost 3.8 kilograms more than patients on placebo.
Patients given topiramate also showed a "much greater" improvement in health-related quality of life than those assigned to the placebo.
"The lowered impairment in social and occupational activities...and the significantly improved emotional well-being...indicate essentially improved health and social life," the researchers write.
While this study is the largest placebo-controlled investigation to date of topiramate for the treatment of bulimia nervosa, Nickel noted, it's still limited because of its small size and the fact that only moderate cases were included.
He and his colleagues conclude: "Additional research is needed to see if these results can be replicated and how long-lasting the benefits are. Studies including male bulimia patients and patients with more severe pathology are also needed."
SOURCE: International Journal of Eating Disorders, December 2005.
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